Guest Post: Marie Loughin, Author of Valknut: The Binding

Just in time to load on that brand new ereader you’re getting for Christmas! Marie Loughin’s novel, Valknut: The Binding is live! When I found out Marie was writing an urban fantasy with roots in Norse mythology, reader greed snagged me by the throat. Vikings and Norse mythology are some of my favorite things.  Marie not only let me read an advance copy of the novel, she agreed to write a guest post for this blog. She answers my nosy question: Why Norse gods?

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Why not the Norse Gods?

When people ask me why I chose to use Norse mythology as the basis for Valknut: The Binding, my short answer is, “Because the Norse pantheon is a dysfunctional, combative bunch. Dysfunctional and combative go better with trains and gangbangers than would, say, the secretive and mysterious nature of the ever-popular Celtic faery.”

That’s the easy answer, though it makes me sound rather arbitrary. As if I woke up one morning and said, “I think I’ll write a book. Maybe I’ll put hobos in it. Yeah. And trains. Every good book has trains. Now, what goes with trains?” Think, think. “Oooo, how about Norse gods?”

Okay, so that’s exactly what happened. I never said I wasn’t arbitrary.

Happily, either my subconscious was at work or the god of serendipity was watching over me, because the Norse gods and their slave-like devotion to Fate were a perfect vehicle for the theme that drove me to write the novel. I’d love to elaborate on this theme, but it might be better if you read the book and figured it out for yourself. (Don’t worry, there are no wrong answers and there will not be a test, later.)

If I were to include all twenty or so Norse deities in the story, there wouldn’t be room for my human characters. I had to narrow the cast. That was tougher than you might think. Norse mythology is full of interesting characters.

Take Thor, for example. He’s hot right now. I could capitalize on that. His temper and impulsiveness would land him in all sorts of interesting predicaments. (This summer’s movie got that right, at least.) But Thor is also a tad slow-witted (also evident in the movie). I wanted someone clever. Someone devious.

Freyja, known for beauty (and, er, promiscuity), has great character potential. She’s associated with both fertility and war. This conveniently makes her capable of perpetuating a never-ending cycle of conflict. Like Odin, she collects fallen warriors and takes them back to her place, though it’s not exactly clear what she wants them for. Maybe Freyja is more suitable for a different kind of story.

Honir is too wishy washy and Hod is blind and all too trusting. They might make good color characters, but don’t fit the bill for clever and devious.

Balder is wise rather than clever, and is the antithesis of devious. He’s depicted as perfect, beautiful, and kind, so naturally some other gods killed him off long before I could consider using him as a character.

Then there’s Loki, the trickster. He’s clever. He’s devious. He’s also unpredictable, which makes him nearly irresistible. In my opinion, he’s the most interesting character in the whole pantheon. I could use Loki. Yessss.

Nooooo. Despite his attributes, Loki plays the wrong part. I wanted the “good” guy to be clever and devious. It all comes back to that theme that I’m not talking about, here.

How about Odin? He was clever enough to trick Fenrir into allowing himself to be tied up with a cord that would hold him until the end of the world. He was devious enough to cheat the re-builder of Asgard out of payment for his labors (long story for another time).  Yet Odin was thought to be good. Early poets called him the Allfather and revered him as the greatest of their gods.

And what about Fenrir, the Wolf? He doesn’t play much of a part in most Norse mythology, largely because he was bound when he was little more than a puppy and couldn’t get around much. Even so, the fate of the pantheon—indeed, of humanity—is tied up with Fenrir (yes, that was a pun). In my mind, the treatment of Fenrir and his two siblings, Hel and Jormungand, is the catalyst for the events leading to the prophesized end of the world. Even more intriguing, Fenrir is fated to eat Odin during the final battle. Clearly these two are not friends. That makes them a perfect fit for my story.

Still, I hate to let those other characters go to waste. Maybe a series?

Think, think.

Marie Loughin loves reading, writing, and editing speculative fiction of all sorts. Her current focus is on writing contemporary fantasy, where she gets to play god with characters from myth and legend. She has recently published a Norse-based urban fantasy, Valknut: The Binding, currently available at Amazon. (Available soon at other retailers.) When she is not writing, Marie makes a living as a statistical consultant, teaches a university-level technical writing course, and embarrasses her husband with her artless attempts to curl. You can find Marie at her blog (marieloughin.com) and on Twitter (@mmloughin).

 

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Me again, I personally think, think Marie should go ahead and turn this into a series. I would love to see further adventures with Lennie and Junkyard Doug and those trouble-making gods.

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10 responses

  1. Thanks, Jaye. I do have ideas, though not necessarily the typical seres 🙂

    1. Not typical? Gee, that would be just awful, Marie. Not. 😉

  2. I can see why Norse mythology would be compelling. I hope you’ve not left out the Norns – my favorites.

  3. As a matter of fact, Merry. You see there are these three– Wait! You have to go read it for yourself. You’ll love Marie’s take on the Norns.

  4. Amazing that you can sit in writers group for years and never hear the genesis of our stories! I admit that I knew extremely little about Norse mythology – raised on those Greek & Roman gods and have a penchant for the Celts & Authurian legends – so not only do I find Valknut: The Binding well written, fast-faced, and entertaining, I also learned something! Thanks Jaye & Marie for sharing this story here.

  5. Hi, Char. One thing I never tire of is listening to writers talk about how their stories come about. I am a total sucker for forewords, afterwords and articles about a writer’s interests and inspirations.

    p.s. I had to peek. I see you just finished a novel. Congrats!

  6. Glad to learn I’m not the only Norse-mythology obsessed writer. Trickster figures draw me like a lodestone! My dog’s pet name is Loki, the Trickster!

    1. One way or another, Loki will figure prominently in the next Norse-based book I write. He’s just too interesting to pass up.

  7. Julia and Marie, have you read Neil Gaiman? His AMERICAN GODS and ANANSI BOYS depict interesting spins on Norse gods.

  8. Yeah, I love Gaiman. I discovered him because my book reminded someone in my writers group of the Sandman graphic novels. I’ve been a fan ever since.

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